Community Development Programs

What is community development? Here at LVCDC.org you can learn the answer to that question, and more. Community development, or CD, is a group of practices and disciplines by activists, civic leaders, professionals and involved citizens to enhance several aspects of their communities. These individuals usually assemble themselves in community organizations and come up with different development programs. Little village community took a variety of approaches, including community capacity building; community economic development; social capital formation; political participatory development; nonviolent direct action; ecologically sustainable development; asset-based community development; faith-based community development; community practice social work; community-based participatory research; community mobilization; community empowerment; community participation and participatory planning. Some of them will be explained here at LVCDC.org.

Participatory planning for instance, is an urban planning paradigm that stresses involvement by entire community in the strategic and management processes of urban planning. Participatory planning methods include mapping and modeling, time lines and trend and change analysis, seasonal calendars, daily time-use analysis, institutional diagramming, matrix scoring and ranking, shared presentations and analysis, and participatory planning, budgeting, implementation and monitoring. Community mobilization on the other hand, is a process where community action, either internally or externally promoted, is planned, undertaken, and assessed by a community's individuals, groups, and organizations on a participatory and steady basis to improve the health, hygiene and education levels and better the overall living conditions in the community. Some of the intangible resources required for community mobilization are leadership, organizational capacity, communications channels, evaluations, problem solving skills, resource mobilization, and administrative and operational management.

Community organizations may also seek to improve the living conditions of other communities besides their own. For example, United Nations Agencies and the World Bank have implemented programs around the world: adult literacy programs, youth and women's groups, development of community business ventures and cooperatives, compensatory education, dissemination of alternative technologies, little village community nutrition programs and permaculture projects and little village community water supply programs.

It is important to note that CD can be an occupation as well as a way to work with communities. The main goal is to build a community upon the bases of equality, justice and mutual respect. Community Development involves shifting the relationships between citizens and officials, so that everybody can take active part in the problems that influence their lives. In every community there is a cache of experience and knowledge that can be used creatively, and focused into collective activity to accomplish the communities' objectives. CD practitioners work together with people to start relationships with essential people and organizations and identify shared concerns. By reading more here at LVCDC.org you just may learn more about little village community and development.